Tag Archives: eating for health

8 Climate-Friendly Superfoods

Superfoods?are gaining popularity?and for good reason. They directly?support the immune system, reduce?inflammation, support mental health,?pack a nutritional punch,?and boost energy, stamina and longevity.

Here are eight?superfoods that are not only good for you, but also good for the planet:

1. Crickets

Crickets are loaded with protein. They also ?thrive in hotter climates and survive off decaying waste and very little water and space,??Mother Jones?reported.?For this reason, crickets and other insects have?been?hailed?as the ?next climate-friendly superfood.? They can be ground into baking flour or protein powder, and added?to cookies, brownies or?milkshakes.

While eating crickets?or any type of insect for that matter?hasn?t completely caught on in the U.S., it?s making progress. Last year, fast food chain?Wayback Burgers?put out?a fake press release as an?April Fool?s joke?about insect-filled milkshakes, but the idea was so popular that they?rolled out their?Oreo Mud Pie Cricket Protein Milkshake.

Related: Are Your Ready for Cricket Flour Cookies?

2. Pulses

They?re the dried seeds of lentils, beans and chickpeas?and they’re super healthy. They already make up 75 percent of the average diet in developing countries, but only 25 percent in developed ones, according to the UN.

That could all change, though. Pulses contain 20 to 25 percent protein by weight, approaching the protein levels of meat, which average?30 to 40 percent. They also require far less water than meat to produce.

3. Amaranth

?Amaranth is the new quinoa,? trend expert Daniel Levine told?The Huffington Post. It?s a grain-like seed that cooks quickly and can be added to salads, soups and stews. It?s a complete source of protein just like quinoa, and it is loaded with?fiber,?B vitamins and?several important minerals. Additionally, it?s been?shown?to reduce inflammation, and lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure.

4. Kefir

Kefir?is the trendiest?fermented?food right now (sorry, kombucha and kimchi).?It?s high in nutrients and?probiotics, and is incredibly beneficial for digestion and?gut health.?Many people consider it to be a healthier and more powerful version of?yogurt.

To make it,??grains? (yeast and lactic acid bacteria cultures) are added to cow or goat milk. The concoction ferments over a 24-hour period and then the grains are removed from the liquid.

Related: 10 Vegan Sources of Probiotics

5.?Teff

Sometimes written as tef or t?ef, this pseudo-grain (it?s technically a seed)?has a high nutritional profile and a taste similar?to that of amaranth or quinoa. This?ancient grain?has survived for centuries without much?hybridization or processing.?Like most other ancient grains, it?s high in fiber, calcium and iron.

Traditionally cultivated in?Ethiopia and Eritrea, teff can be grown in a variety of conditions.?Teff ?thrives in both waterlogged soils and during?droughts, making it a dependable staple wherever it?s grown. No matter what the weather, teff crops will likely survive, as they are also relatively free of plant diseases compared to other cereal crops,??Whole Grains Council?said.

?Teff can grow where many other crops won?t thrive, and in fact can be produced from sea level to as high as 3,000 meters of altitude, with maximum yield at about 1,800-2,100 meters high,? the council said. ?This versatility could explain why teff is now being cultivated in areas as diverse as dry and mountainous Idaho and the low and wet Netherlands.?

6. Moringa

It?s often called the ?the miracle tree? or the ?tree of life,? according to?TIME. It?s commonly found in?Asian and African countries, and almost every part of it?pods, leaves, seeds and roots?is edible. It?s a?good source?of Vitamin B6, Vitamin C and iron. Not only does it pack a nutritional punch, it?s also a?fast-growing, drought-tolerant plant?that is a promising biofuel and medicinal source.

Related: Why Moringa is Known as ‘The Miracle Tree’

7. Kelp

Kelp grows super fast (up to two feet per day), and requires neither freshwater nor fertilizer. ?And rather than contributing to our carbon footprint, as many fertilizers and food sources do, seaweed cleanses the ocean of excess nitrogen and carbon dioxide,??Mother Jones?reported. One kelp?farmer on the Long Island Sound even?claims?he?s?restoring?the ocean while producing a sustainable food and fuel source.

8. Waste-Based Food

This isn?t as weird as it sounds. In order to reduce?food waste, restaurants are finding?creative ways?to use the edible?parts of plants and animals that are often thrown out. Last year, award-winning chef Dan Barber held a?two-week pop-up?at Blue Hill, his restaurant in New York City, where he cooked with spent grain, cocoa beans, pasta scraps and?vegetable?pulp.

Written by Cole Mellino. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.?

Related Stories:

Is Climate Change Making Chocolate Taste Better?
Climate Change is Putting Your Favorite Foods at Risk
How Climate Change is Bad For Our Pets

Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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8 Climate-Friendly Superfoods

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How to Tell Which Foods Are In Season this Fall

Winter, spring, summer, fall…each new season brings with it a multitude of unique tastes and smells. Squash, pumpkin, chestnuts, and freshly picked apples signify that fall has come. Colorful bell peppers, cherries, and watermelon taste like summer.

It’s comforting knowing that everything has its place, isn’t it? That you can count on fresh apricots and corn on the cob when warm weather comes around. But the benefits of eating in-season produce go far beyond those daily comforts.

Seasonal food is produce that is “purchased and consumed around the time that it is harvested.” As such, eating seasonally means greater?access to a more nutritious diet, a reduction in your?carbon footprint, and financial savings in your pocket thanks to the?nature of abundance. But how do you know which foods are in season when fall rolls around?

How to Tell Which Foods Are In Season this Fall

With grocery stores sourcing?produce worldwide?it can be hard to tell which types of produce are actually in season and which were shipped from a warmer climate thousands of miles away. Here’s where you can start.

1) Check out the Seasonal Food Guide.

The Seasonal Food Guide?is an easy online tool that you can use to determine which foods are in season when, based on your exact location and the time of the year. Through this tool I discovered that the best produce available in Wyoming right now is: apples, beets, brussels sprouts and carrots! Cool, right?

2) Visit your local farmer’s market.

Shopping at the farmer’s market is a wonderful way to see seasonal produce right in front of you ? question answered! This week at our Cheyenne Farmer’s Market we saw lots of squash, pumpkins, and carrots galore. Need some recipe inspiration? Here are fourteen delicious recipes to make this harvest season.

3) Ask your neighbors.

At this time of the year, most gardeners have more produce than they know what to do with. Do your friends have fall tomatoes coming out their ears? Who knows, they may need someone to take them off their hands! Over time, you’ll grow more familiar with which foods are growing at any given time.


What fresh fruits and vegetables?get you excited about this fall??

Related at Care2

14 Foods to Eat this Harvest Season
Is it better to buy local or organic?
4 Vegetables to Plant Now for a Fall Harvest

Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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How to Tell Which Foods Are In Season this Fall

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With These Veggie Burger Ideas, You’ll Never Crave Beef Again

Veggie burgers have gotten a bad rap over the years. Flaccid, bland, mushy and unsatisfying, the veggie burgers you remember may have been anything but appetizing. But, times have changed. In fact, two of the most highly demanded burgers in NYC right now are actually veggie burgers. That’s right, today’s veggie burgers encourageequal opportunity salivation from vegans and carnivores alike.

Not only can veggie burgers taste as good as their beefy cousins, but their rising popularity is a powerful factorinthe fight against climate change. Americans eat around 50 billion burgers a year, or about 40 pounds of bun-nestled ground beef per person.

Unfortunately, the livestock industry uses precious resources at a rate that is harming our planet. Just one pound of grain-fed beef requires 1800 gallons of water, while a single quarter-pounder is responsible for creating 6 1/2 pounds of greenhouse gases.

That being said, if merely 1 out of every 5 beef burgers consumed were veggie burgers, wed save trillions of gallons of water and 32.5 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions each year, among other benefits. And thats just if everyone were to swap 2 of the average 12 burgers we consume each month for hearty veggie burgers. Does that seem like too much to ask? Watch the video below to learn more about how our relentless hamburger consumption impacts our environment and our health.

The first step toward change is creating a delicious veggie burger you’ll want to eat. When it comes down to it, all good veggie burgers have 6 basic component: a bulky base, vegetables, textural ingredients, binding agents, liquid ingredients and flavorings.

Here is a great guideline to develop your own unique veggie burger recipe, or to help you experiment with any of the recipes below!

Care2 Veggie Burger Guidelines

– 2 to 2 1/2 cups bulky base: cooked rice, mashed beans, cooked quinoa, mashed tofu, corn masa, chickpea flour, cooked teff flour, almond meal, coconut flour, et cetera (feel free to mix multiple ingredients into your base)

– 1 to 1 1/2 cups vegetables: onions, zucchini, sweet potato, broccoli, kale, carrots, chard (make sure you cook them first to avoid mushy burgers)

– 2-4 tablespoons of texture: chopped nuts, seeds, tempeh, olives, et cetera

– 1/2 to 1 cup of binding agent: around 1 cup gluten-free rolled oats/breadcrumbs, or a few eggs/flax eggs

– a dash of flavor: use plenty of sauted garlic, ginger, paprika, fresh oregano, cumin, curry powder, salt, pepper, chile powder, et cetera, in quantities to suit your tastes

– 1 to 4 tablespoons of liquid (if needed): umeboshi vinegar, lemon juice, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar, unsweetened hemp/almond milk, vegetable broth

Add base (making sure any grains are precooked) along withchopped, roasted veggies to a food processor and pulse until combined. Quickly pulse in textural ingredients. Transfer mixture to a bowl and stir/knead in your binding agent and flavorings. Stir in liquids at this time if needed. The dough should be neither too wet nor too dry, with the ideal consistency being that of soft sugar cookie dough. Roll the dough into balls and flatten into 1/4 inch thick patties. Sprinkle on a coating of masa, chickpea flour or panko breadcrumbs to ensure your burgers are extra crispy on the outside (optional). Cook in a light coating of your favorite cooking oil over medium heat, or bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes, flipping halfway through. If you create a sturdy enough burger, you can even try grilling!

Not into experimentation? Try these 6 veggie burger recipes to inspire and expand your tastebuds:

The Basic Veggie Burger: Looking for a basic yet tasty recipe to get you started? Look no further. Fork and Knives offers a great recipe that includes a base of vegetables, beans, rice, seasonings and nuts (optional). The burger is covered in cornmeal or chickpea flour to ensure an extra crispy crust develops during baking.

The Grill-Worthy Veggie Burger: While seriously lacking in vegetables, this burger is both high in protein and sturdy enough to handle a good grilling. The grill is what makes a burger quintessentially a burger, after all. These hearty burgers from Minimalist Baker contain brown rice, walnuts, onions, beans, breadcrumbs and spices.

The Paleo Veggie Burger: Just because you are Paleo doesnt mean you only eat meat. In fact, people in the Paleolithic era most certainly only binged on meat once in a while when a hunt went successfully. But, can a burger without beans, meat or soy really live up to American burger standards? You be the judge. This burger from Apples to Zoodles uses coconut oil, cauliflower, carrots, onions, sweet potato, zucchini, almond flour, coconut flour, eggs and spices to concoct a tasty veggie patty that is totally Paleo-friendly. Even better, the vegetables are cooked prior to using to ensure a less mushy interior. Give it a tryliving a Paleo lifestyle is no excuse not to tread lightly on the planet.

The Green Veggie Burger: Cant get enough green vegetables in your life? Then you should make sure you pack your veggie burger chock full of greens. Filled with peas, kale, broccoli and celery, this bright greenburger isnt trying to hide the fact that its loaded with vegetables. This completely vegan burger comes from Vegan Heaven.

The Red Veggie Burger: Its natural that you should alternate your favorite green burger with a red one. This beet-based burger includes shiitake mushrooms, smoked tofu, tempeh, sundried tomato, garlic and sunflower seeds. Sound tasty? You bet! Check it out at Love and Garnish.

The Foodie Veggie Burger: If you love to cook and you love playing with interesting flavors in the kitchen, this recipe from New York Times Cooking has perfected the flavor, texture and look so that even the staunchest carnivore will crave it on a delicate brioche bun. The secret to this burgers success is the variety of different ingredientswet, dry and binding and that the most watery ingredients are roasted beforehand to prevent mushiness. With a combination of soy, egg, cheese, nuts and breadcrumbs, this recipe isnt allergen-friendly, but, for those who can enjoy, its sure to be tasty.

Once you have your favorite veggie burger recipedown, get creative! Add Thai flavors, homemade BBQ sauce, smokey chipotle, curry spices or your favorite flavors. Veggie burgers dont have to be mushy and boring. They should be nutritious and delicious flavor explosions that make both you and the planet happy!

Related:

What Happens When You Stop Exercising
4 Reasons Why Flax Seeds Are the Duct Tape of Health
3 Natural Deodorants That Actually Work!

Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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With These Veggie Burger Ideas, You’ll Never Crave Beef Again

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How to Tell if You’re Being Scammed by ‘Organic’ Labels

Last month,Consumer Reportscontinued its crusade against the use of the term natural on food labels. The website and magazine has for several years correctly asserted that natural is one of the most misleading and meaningless food labels out thereand yet it’s used on product after product after product.

In a newsurvey of 1,005 shoppers,Consumer Reportsfound that two-thirds of shoppers believe natural means more than it does (note: the termis not even defined by the FDA) and almost half assume natural claims on labels are independently verified.

The meaningless natural label is one thing. But what about organic? Can we be sure that when products are labeled organic, it means they are almost completely pesticide-free?

Not always. Take companies whose name includes the word organics or organics. After the Cornucopia Institute, an organic industry watchdog group, exposeda number of companies who were skirting the qualifications for organic by putting the word in their products’ names, the United States Department of Agricultureattempted to clarify its stance on the matterin late 2014. Unfortunately for us, the USDA didn’t clear up much, saying that it would address potential violators on a case-by-case basis:

While we believe that the term, organic, in a brand name context does not inherently imply an organic production or handling claim and, thus, does not inherently constitute a false or misleading statement, we intend to monitor the use of the term in the context of the entire label. We will consult with the FTC and FDA regarding product and company names that may misrepresent the nature of the product and take action on a case-by-case basis.

Did you catch that? The USDA admits that the use of organic or 100 percent organic on food labels on non-certified products may be misleading, but claims organic in a company name does not imply organic production or handling. As a shopper, isthat how you see it? If most consumers believe natural implies a certain standard of production and handling, how much more is this true for a hyper-specific term like organic?

The best way to know for certain that a product is certified organic is the presence of theUSDA’s organic labelthe gold standard. Before a product can bear it, a government certifier personally inspects the facility, ensuring that no less than 95 percent of ingredients are organic and non-GMO, and that animal products contain no antibiotics or growth hormones.

As for everything else making grand claims or putting organic in the name? Verify, verify, verify.

Written by Steve Holt. Reposted with permission from Thrive Market.

More from Thrive Market:

The Many Health and Beauty Benefits of Raw Honey
The Terrifying New Film About GMOs You Need to See
5 Strange Superfoods that Belong in Your Smoothie

Photo credit: Paul Delmont

Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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How to Tell if You’re Being Scammed by ‘Organic’ Labels

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8 Climate-Friendly Superfoods for 2016

Superfoodsare gaining popularityand for good reason. They directlysupport the immune system, reduceinflammation, support mental health,pack a nutritional punch,and boost energy, stamina and longevity.

Here are eightsuperfoods to watch in 2016 that are not only good for you, but also good for the planet:

1. Crickets

Long-consumed in many parts of the developing world, crickets are makingtheir way into cookies, milkshakes and other food items in the U.S.Photo credit: Shutterstock

Crickets are loaded with protein. They also thrive in hotter climates and survive off decaying waste and very little water and space,Mother Jonesreported.For this reason, crickets and other insects havebeenhailedas the next climate-friendly superfood. They can be ground into baking flour or protein powder, and addedto cookies, brownies ormilkshakes.

While eating cricketsor any type of insect for that matterhasnt completely caught on in the U.S., its making progress. Last year, fast food chainWayback Burgersput outa fake press release as anApril Fools jokeabout insect-filled milkshakes, but the idea was so popular that theyrolled out theirOreo Mud Pie Cricket Protein Milkshake.

2. Pulses

Theyre the dried seeds of lentils, beans and chickpeasand the UN hasdeclared2016 to be their year. They already make up 75 percent of the average diet in developing countries, but only 25 percent in developed ones, according to the UN.

That could all change, though. Pulses contain 20 to 25 percent protein by weight, approaching the protein levels of meat, which average30 to 40 percent. They also require far less water than meat to produce.

3. Amaranth

Amaranth is a complete source of protein.Photo credit: Shutterstock

Amaranth is the new quinoa, trend expert Daniel Levine toldThe Huffington Post. Its a grain-like seed that cooks quickly and can be added to salads, soups and stews. Its a complete source of protein just like quinoa, and it is loaded withfiber,B vitamins andseveral important minerals. Additionally, its beenshownto reduce inflammation, and lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure.

4. Kefir

Kefiris the trendiestfermentedfood right now (sorry, kombucha and kimchi).Its high in nutrients andprobiotics, and is incredibly beneficial for digestion andgut health.Many people consider it to be a healthier and more powerful version ofyogurt.

To make it,grains (yeast and lactic acid bacteria cultures) are added to cow or goat milk. The concoction ferments over a 24-hour period and then the grains are removed from the liquid.

5.Teff

Sometimes written as tef or tef, this pseudo-grain (its technically a seed)has a high nutritional profile and a taste similarto that of amaranth or quinoa. Thisancient grainhas survived for centuries without muchhybridization or processing.Like most other ancient grains, its high in fiber, calcium and iron.

Traditionally cultivated inEthiopia and Eritrea, teff can be grown in a variety of conditions.Teff thrives in both waterlogged soils and duringdroughts, making it a dependable staple wherever its grown. No matter what the weather, teff crops will likely survive, as they are also relatively free of plant diseases compared to other cereal crops,Whole Grains Councilsaid.

Teff can grow where many other crops wont thrive, and in fact can be produced from sea level to as high as 3,000 meters of altitude, with maximum yield at about 1,800-2,100 meters high, the council said. This versatility could explain why teff is now being cultivated in areas as diverse as dry and mountainous Idaho and the low and wet Netherlands.

6. Moringa

Moringa can be ground intoa powder.Photo credit: Shutterstock

Its often called the the miracle tree or the tree of life, according toTIME. Its commonly found inAsian and African countries, and almost every part of itpods, leaves, seeds and rootsis edible. Its agood sourceof Vitamin B6, Vitamin C and iron. Not only does it pack a nutritional punch, its also afast-growing, drought-tolerant plantthat is a promising biofuel and medicinal source.

7. Kelp

Kelp grows super fast (up to two feet per day), and requires neither freshwater nor fertilizer. And rather than contributing to our carbon footprint, as many fertilizers and food sources do, seaweed cleanses the ocean of excess nitrogen and carbon dioxide,Mother Jonesreported. One kelpfarmer on the Long Island Sound evenclaimshesrestoringthe ocean while producing a sustainable food and fuel source.

8. Waste-Based Food

This isnt as weird as it sounds. In order to reducefood waste, restaurants are findingcreative waysto use the edibleparts of plants and animals that are often thrown out. Last year, award-winning chef Dan Barber held atwo-week pop-upat Blue Hill, his restaurant in New York City, where he cooked with spent grain, cocoa beans, pasta scraps andvegetablepulp.

Written by Cole Mellino. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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8 Climate-Friendly Superfoods for 2016

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How to Drink Green Juice and Still Be “Green”

Starting your day with a big glass of green juice is a hot health trend, as these emerald blends can give you a big boost of important nutrients. But juices and smoothies loaded with kale and spinach arent necessarily the other kind of greenthe eco-friendly kind.

Dont get me wrongI love juicing. It helps me get more servings of fruits and vegetables per day, and drinking it makes me feel virtuous. Below are some tips for making a juice that’s healthy for both you and the planet.

Make your own

Skip the store-bought juices with all their disposable packaging. Even if you put the bottles in recycling, it still requires a lot of energy and water for the recycling process. Instead, use a juicer or blender at home to not only have more control over your ingredients, but also to save money and cut down on trash.

Or if the prospect of washing and chopping all that produce is too much for you to bear, consider bringing your own reusable bottle to your local juice shop.

Be sparing with superfoods

Acai? Cacao? These exotic tropical species might be very nutritious, but so many superfood trends come from far away lands. These well-traveled ingredients have a bigger carbon footprint than produce thats grown closer to home.

Now, I know most people arent going to give up on chocolate, tea or coffee if its not produced in their region. However, it will still be friendlier to Mother Nature if you choose more of the nutrient-packed produce thats grown in your area. Here in New York, I love to make a seasonal juice with local winter vegetables, like carrots and beetsand naturally sweeten it with apple.

Go organic

Many juice experts recommend organic juice for health reasons, butorganic agriculture is arguably even more important for the health of the planet. When you buy organic fruits and veggies for your juice, youre supporting farmers who use fewer harmful pesticides and less synthetic fertilizer. If you care about avoiding genetically modified foods, buying organic also takes care of that.

Get ugly

Ugly produce that is! What matters here is the quality of the juicenot the physical beauty. Go ahead, buy that twisted carrot, that bulbous cucumber or the bruised apple. Some grocers are even offering discounts on their less beautiful produce. Looks wont matter once everything is blended into your smoothie, and youll be helping cut down on food waste.

Also, greens that are just a touch too wilted for salad are often still suitable for use in juice.

Compost

If you use a juicer like me, youre going to end up with a lot of pulpand even blender users will have their fair share of cores, peels and stems. Be sure tocompost these food trimmingsinstead of putting them in the garbage.

by Margaret Badore, from Treehugger

Disclaimer: The views expressed above are solely those of the author and may not reflect those of Care2, Inc., its employees or advertisers.

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How to Drink Green Juice and Still Be “Green”

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Vegan: Easier Than You Think

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Driscoll’s Organic Strawberries Make a Big Move Forward, But is it Enough?

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A New Test Can Finally Tell You What’s in Your Tuna

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A New Test Can Finally Tell You What’s in Your Tuna

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